Tuesday, April 16, 2019

Thought for the day #raghudonspeaks

Be more Concerned with *Your Character than with Your Reputation.*

*Your Character is what You Really Are,* 

while

*Your Reputation is merely what Others Think You Are..*

*Gm. Hv an Awesome Day!*🌹😃





https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LFD0oEI1tWM&t=316s 

"Price Is What You Pay, Value Is What You Get !"

Read more...

Saturday, April 13, 2019

#raghudonapeaks - Happiness what does it mean?

Recently Raghudon was having a moment of self talk and gself thought.... I remembered a line from one of my favorite books.   
Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert M. Pirsig. "The place to improve the world is first in one's own heart and head and hands, and then work outward from there." "When one person suffers from a delusion, it is called insanity. When many people suffer from a delusion it is called a Religion."
OK, forget about the religion part... I got thinking about Happiness. 

It's seen that most of our lives aims we want to be happy, but never. The below ramblings are just thoughts in motion in that direction. 

What's your definition of happiness? Research in the field of positive psychology and happiness often define a happy person as someone who experiences frequent positive emotions, such as joy, interest, and pride, and infrequent (though not absent) negative emotions, such as sadness, anxiety and anger (Lyubomirsky et al., 2005). Happiness has also been said to relate to life satisfaction, appreciation of life, moments of pleasure, but overall it has to do with the positive experience of emotions.

The key to these definitions is that positive emotions do not indicate the absence of negative emotions. A "happy person" experiences the spectrum of emotions just like anybody else, but the frequency by which they experience the negative ones may differ. It could be that "happy people" don't experience as much negative emotion because they process it differently or they may find meaning in a way others have not. In fact, using the phrase "happy person" is probably incorrect because it assumes that they are naturally happy or that positive things happen to them more often. Nobody is immune to life's stressors, but the question is whether you see those stressors as moments of opposition or moments of opportunity.

Regardless of where you are on the happiness spectrum, each person has their own way of defining happiness. Philosophers, actors, politicians, and everybody in between have all weighed in on their own view of happiness. Read some of our favorite definitions below and let us know what resonated with you. 

The ancient Greeks defined happiness as:

"Happiness is the joy that we feel when we're striving after our potential."

Shirley MacLaine, Academy Award winner, said:

"To be happy, you have to be willing to be compliant with not knowing."

Michael J. Fox said:

"My happiness grows in direct proportion to my acceptance, and in inverse proportion to my expectations."


Gabrielle Bernstein, author, said:

"Choosing happiness is the path of least resistance."

Aristotle said:

"Happiness is a state of activity."

Dr. Shefali Tsabary, psychologist and author, said:

"Only when we fill our own need and feel satiated from within can we truly be fulfilled and happy."

Eleanor Roosevelt said:

"Someone once asked me what I regarded as the three most important requirements for happiness. My answer was: A feeling that you have been honest with yourself and those around you; a feeling that you have done the best you could both in your personal life and in your work; and the ability to love others."

What's great about all these definitions is that commonalities start emerging. Shirley MacLaine and Michael J. Fox tell us to accept life's situations and to accept uncertainty as a natural part of life. And the greater we are able to do that, the greater we can lean into happiness. Mastin Kipp tells us it's ok to not strive to be happy, but accept whatever we're feeling. He hints at an important concept, which is that we so often try to fix things and get to be "happy" or "at peace" or "over a situation," but sometimes we need to acknowledge what we're feeling (whatever that is). What you often find is that acknowledgement will allow you to move into the "happy space" more quickly because your emotions aren't trying to get your attention. Your emotions aren't screaming at you, telling you that you're sad or angry. You've already begun the work of processing it.

So now it's your turn to begin finding the happiness in you. What brings you joy? Maybe it's a night in watching TV. Maybe it's a night out at a new restaurant in town. Maybe it's staying up late watching a movie with your significant other. Maybe it depends on your mood. Wherever your happiness resides, go enjoy it. And tell us which of these definitions of happiness resonated with you most





https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LFD0oEI1tWM&t=316s 

"Price Is What You Pay, Value Is What You Get !"

Read more...

Sunday, March 17, 2019

The Only Thing We Control Is Our Reaction

External events do not harm us — only our responses to them can

It may sound counterintuitive — "of course external events can harm us!" we might protest, "I can get hit by a bus, or my partner might leave me!"

But the reality is that the story doesn't actually end with the external occurrence, even though so many people think it does. We perceive and talk about these events as though they are the defining moment, and sort of gloss over everything available to us afterwards.

These events only have the power that we choose to give them. They only destroy us because we think they are destructive, and allow them to run our lives.

Eleanor Roosevelt famously said,

"No one can make you feel inferior without your consent."

And the same is true with anything external — not just other people.

If our judgement about any event is that it is horrible, then we allow ourselves to dwell in the belief that we are far worse off if they happen. But if we strip external events of their power, and reclaim our internal power to decide, gage, and assign value, we maintain control of our lives — and happiness.

Because our internal judgements are independent of external events, the occurrence of a bad event does not necessarily have to result in sadness.

If we lose something dear to us and get down ourselves, the problem is not the loss, but our outlook on it.

Life results in loss. Loss will happen. It's part of being alive. And while loss looks different from person to person and we may experience different things, to go through life allowing anyloss to bully us or push us around emotionally in any direction that it chooses is to surrender our control — and wellbeing.

We assign to much power to internal emotions as well

And not nearly enough to reason and balance; to reclaiming control rather than allowing ourselves to be rocked by what we feel.

Roman politician and lawyer Cicero said,

"When misfortunes appear on the horizon, we exaggerate then once more, because of the pain they are causing us. These feelings compel us to put blame on the circumstances when what we ought to be blaming is a deficiency in our own character."

Obviously, most of us are not immune to external events. Most of us are going to feel negative emotions — anger, sadness, heartbreak, etc. — over negative things happening.

But recognizing that there is an inner core that is free no matter the circumstances, and recognizing that our mindset is not at the mercy of external events — or our immediate emotional response to it — but rather something that is under our own control can go a long way in fostering a healthier, happier outlook.

And it can help us maintain emotional wellbeing when things do go wrong — which they will.

All of us will experience setbacks and loss. But it is only our assessment of the loss and how much power we choose to give it, especially through emotion — that makes us sad. And our wellbeing, conversely, is also entirely in our own control — should we only choose.



Raghunandan Jagdish





https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LFD0oEI1tWM&t=316s 

"Price Is What You Pay, Value Is What You Get !"

Read more...

About This Blog

  © Blogger templates The Professional Template by Ourblogtemplates.com 2008

Back to TOP