Tuesday, October 03, 2017

Gun control in the USA.

The point is u want a pistol and rifle... Ok
I want automatic weapons.. Why!!! What is ur right thay gets sullied by not having weapons. I think in the private space they may have more guns than the Indian army. All it needs is a deranged guy.
Isis will take responsibility even if trump has an upset tummy and farts 4 times in the day.
And we have not seen the end of this.

Raghudon predicts that sadly more of these deranged attacks will happen. And not all will be Islamic terrorists (btw a white guy will be never called a terrorist)
Being a psychiatrist at this time will make a person Rich.

BTW in India to cause these many death even a gun is not needed. And just a day later it's travel as usual and people have forgotten. Is it reseliance or short term memory loss???

Uncle Sam please pull the plug on guns. Else we will have John Rambo with their own causes in every major city.

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Saturday, March 26, 2016

Developing a Winning Go To Market Strategy


What is a Go To Market Strategy?
How does your business connect with its customers? How do you deliver your unique value to your target customers? How do you go from the initial connection with a potential customer to the fulfillment of your brand promise?
The answer to these vital questions define your go-to-market strategy.
Your go-to-market strategy brings together all of the key elements that drive your business: sales, marketing, distribution, pricing, brand development, competitive analysis, and consumer insights.
It provides a strategic action plan that clarifies how to reach your target customers and better compete in your marketplace.
Go to market strategies can be applied to new product launches as well as existing products and services.
Benefits of a Go To Market Strategy
A go-to-market (GTM) strategy has numerous benefits. It helps your business:
  • Reduce time to market
  • Reduce costs associated with failed product launches
  • Increase ability to adapt to change
  • Manage innovation challenges
  • Ensure effective customer experience
  • Ensure regulatory compliance
  • Ensure a successful product launch
  • Avoid the wrong path
  • Establish path for growth
  • Clarifies plan and direction for all
Developing a comprehensive GTM strategy is an investment in time and resources, but it can help illuminate and ensure a viable path to market success.
What's Inside Your GTM Strategy?
The goal of a GTM strategy is to improve key business outcomes. This is mainly accomplished by aligning to the evolving needs of your customers.
To create an effective GTM strategy for your business, you want to create a detailed plan with the following six ingredients:
  1. Markets: What markets do you want to pursue?
  2. Customers: Who are you selling to? Who is your target customer?
  3. Channels: Where do your target customers buy? Where will you promote your products?
  4. Product (or Offering): What product/service are you selling? And what unique value do you offer to each target customer group?
  5. Price: How much will you charge for your products for each customer group?
  6. Positioning: What is your unique value or primary differentiation? How will you connect to what matters to your target customers and position your brand?
If you can concisely and effectively answer these six questions, you'll be in the position to formulate a winning GTM strategy.
An Example from Southwest Airlines
Southwest Airlines is recognized as one of the most innovative and trendsetting companies in the cutthroat industry of commercial aviation.
Southwest was so innovative, in fact, that many larger airlines and airports tried to prevent the company from getting off the ground in the early 1970's.
Instead of using the traditional "hub and spoke" flight routing system employed by most major airlines, Southwest opted for a "Point to Point" system.
Most airlines have "hubs" in particular major cities where most flights connect through (think of a hub on a wheel with many spokes coming out of the center). Southwest's Point to Point system takes passengers from one to another without using any hubs.
Only about 20 percent Southwest's passengers are connecting passengers—the vast majority are local—making the point to point system more effective for their target customers.
This is just one example of how Southwest's go-to-market strategy help the airline stay on top and deliver what its markets want most.
Before You Begin
GTM strategies, like any corporate strategy, is a matter of asking the right questions (and in the right order).
As a business leader, it is helpful to play the role of "strategic coach" and run through the following questions with your executive team:
  1. Where are you now? What is the current state of affairs in your business? Take inventory of your current business position and the current climate in your marketplace.
  2. Where do you want to go? What is the desired end picture of this new initiative? Define your ultimate vision.
  3. What has to happen to get you to your end picture? What strategic options are available to you? Determine the best solution paths to realizing your vision.
The main distinction between an overall corporate strategy and a GTM strategy is that the latter has a greater emphasis on connecting with your customers: sales, marketing, branding, distribution, customer touch points, and so on.
How Long Will Your GTM Strategy Take to Execute?
A comprehensive GTM strategy that includes a detailed analysis of your target markets, customer segments, budget requirements, offers, positioning can take several weeks (or longer) to formulate.
Successful implementation of a new GTM strategy can take 12 to 36 months.
It is important to keep in mind that a GTM strategy is a long-term approach to building profitability, decreasing customer acquisition cost, and enhancing the customer experience.
Key Objectives of Your GTM Strategy
Your GTM strategy has several strategic objectives including to:
  • Create awareness of your offering
  • Convert your initial customers
  • Maximize your market share by encroaching on your competitors, entering new markets, and increasing customer engagement
  • Defend your present market share against competitors
  • Reinforce your brand position
  • Reduce cost and maximize profitability
As an integral strategy for your long-term business success, let's take a look at the seven key steps for developing your strategy.
Seven Steps to Creating a GTM Strategy
Here are the seven vital steps to formulating your strategy:
Step 1: Define Your Target Markets
No product is appropriate for every market. Clarifying your ideal target markets is a vital element to formulating your GTM strategy.
Factors might include demographics, psychographics, ethnographics, drivers of need, buyer personas, online/offline, and geography.
Remember you can't profitably pursue every market so you want to determine where you can most effectively differentiate your brand and attract the most profitable customers who resonate with your offering.
Force yourself to sacrifice and focus on what matters most.
Start by brainstorming a master list of all possible markets you could pursue. Then, determine how you will assess each market opportunity. You may use metrics like market size, growth trends, ability to compete, barriers to entry, the economics of each market.
Consider:
  • Which markets have the biggest and most urgent pain?
  • Where are there gaps in the market?
  • Which markets are most aligned with your corporate strategy?
  • Which markets best match your core competencies?
  • Which markets can you most easily reach?
  • Which markets have the largest market size and least competition?
Next, assess each market for accessibility, alignment, and overall opportunity. Do what you can to test or validate each market opportunity with key stakeholders.
Review feedback from current and prospective clients as well as employees on the front line. Review trend data from available sources. Try using customer surveys and external focus groups.
Finally, prioritize your market opportunities and refine them on an ongoing basis.
Ultimately, you're best opportunities will also attract your competitors, so defining your target markets is insufficient in itself.
You will still need to differentiate your offer and position your brand. But at least now you will have the confidence that you're fishing where your fish are.
Step 2: Define Your Target Customer
Management guru Peter Drucker reminds us, "The purpose of business is to create a customer."
The driving force behind this step is developing customer intelligence. You want to become masterful at generating actionable consumer insights through web surveys, focus groups, one-on-one in-depth interviews, in-store interactions, and more.
Here's a list of questions that require thoughtful deliberation:
  • Who is your business especially for? Who are your Brand Lovers? That is, who will be your most profitable customers?
  • What human needs are you trying to satisfy in your target customers?
  • What internal tensions are you attempting to resolve?
  • What problems are you trying to solve?
  • What is the ideal experience you're trying to create for your target customers?
  • What are the emotions you want your Brand Lovers to experience when they interact with you?
Your goal is to understand who your customers are, how they behave, and what they experience. The better consumer insights you have, the better chances you have for executing an effective GTM strategy.
Step 3: Define Your Brand Positioning
Brand positioning is the process of positioning your brand in the mind of your customers. If management takes an intelligence, forward-looking approach, it can positively influence its brand's position in the eyes of its target customers.
Step 4: Define Your Offering
Now define your product or the product's unique value proposition. Understanding your product's key features and benefits is the first step. Then you must understand exactly how your product connects with your customers: the context of their use, the solutions it solves, the benefits they derive.
Here are some key questions to bring clarity to your offering:
  • What needs or tensions do your target customers need solved?
  • Which features in your offering best address these needs?
  • How will customers use it?
  • What are important attributes or benefits of your offering?
  • How is your offering differentiated in the marketplace?
To help determine the product's unique value proposition, put yourself in your target customer's perspective when you think about presenting your company's offering. Consider:
  • What do you want your customers to think?
  • What do you want them to feel?
  • What do you want them to believe?
  • What do you want them to remember?
The better insights you have about your customers, the more effective you can be at defining your offering. This means you need to get to know your customers, to obsess about your customers.
Talk to them, listen to them, and get to know them. This step will also help you create more effective marketing messages later on.
Step 5: Define Your Channels
You link your offering to your customers through channels. Channels might include a retail store, Internet, a customer service call center, face to face salesperson, a trade show, a seminar, or a direct partner.
Amazon.com's primary channel is its website. Walmart's primary channel is its retail chain. BWM's primary channel is its dealerships. LL Bean's primary channels are its catalogs, call center, and website. AT&T's channels include its authorized dealers (partners), independent retail stores, and website.
Your goal isn't just to identify your channels, but to ensure that each channel is as seamlessly integrated with each other as possible.
Customers should be have a consistent brand experience no matter what channel or touch pointthrough which they interact with you.
The key questions in your channel analysis are:
  • Where do you reach your target customers?
  • Where do your target customers buy?
  • Where will you promote your products?
  • What is the right distribution model?
  • How do you develop the right distribution channels?
  • Does the channel fit your offering?
  • How does your offering fit with your target markets and channels?
  • How would customers desire to interact with you?
  • What level of interaction do your target customers require?
  • Can you create a competitive advantage?
You want to make sure your offering fits your channel. For example, it is difficult to sell complex services or certain high-priced products over the web.
Step 6: Build Your Budget Model
Once you've defined your channels, you're ready to build a budget model. Here you'll want to define your product pricing and estimate costs associate with your GTM strategy.
To develop your pricing model, consider:
  • What is the value your offering to your target customers?
  • Are there existing price expectations?
  • How do you price your product relative to your competitors?
  • Is there a way to create a competitive advantage with your pricing model?
Channel economics is an important to consider. For example, most airlines, like JetBlue, charges a $25 booking fee when you book a flight over the phone while charging no fees for online booking. There's little variable cost for web transactions, but call center representatives are expensive.
Your goal might be to develop a revenue model based on anticipated market penetration, average transaction size, number of transaction, and so on.
Consider:
  • Based on your market definitions (step 1), what are your primary goals for market share penetration?
  • What are your estimated margins over the next one-, two-, and three-year horizon, factoring in startup and ongoing expenses?
  • What are the human resources requirements for the first year of execution?
To help mitigate risk, it is advisable to identify the economic, competitive, and internal risks associated with executing this strategy. Outline the biggest risks that may affect your ability to reach your goals and develop strategies to address how to overcome them.
Step 7: Define Your Marketing Strategy
Now it's time to put all of the pieces of this massive puzzle together. You're going to want to develop a unique marketing strategy for each target market you've identified in step 1.
Your marketing mix will be determined by your strategy in each market. Starting with your brand positioning, your goal is to create competitive advantages for your product offering.
To develop your marketing tactics, consider:
  • How do you reach the economic buyers and influencers of your target markets?
  • What messages will motivate them to consideration and purchase?
Keep in mind that your marketing objectives and strategy might change throughout the product lifecycle so be ready to adapt.
Be sure to measure and track your key performance metrics on a weekly and monthly basis so you can make adjustments to your strategies, investments, and human resources.
Now It's Your Turn
As Sun Tzu said in The Art of War, "Let your plans be dark and impenetrable as night, and when you move, fall like a thunderbolt."
An effective GTM strategy is based on the art of delighting your customers and surprising your competitors. Consider how hard Apple used to work to keep the the plans of their new iPhone secret until "the right moment" to go to market with their new product.
Once you are in the process of rolling out your strategy you won't have time to plan as you'll be more reactive due to your deadline pressures. Thoughtfully and thoroughly walking through these vital steps gives your organization the greatest chance of success.
Best of luck in your go to market journey!
Get Marketing Stra

Best Regards,

Raghunandan Jagdish / CEO & Director 
raghu@nandan.co.in / +91-9322692934


NANDAN GROUND SUPPORT EQUIPMENT PVT LTD 
Office: +91-22-2763 5508/09, 39321122 / Fax: +91-22-2763 5510 
D - 205 MIDC Turbhe, Navi Mumbai - 400705, India 
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Friday, February 12, 2016

Failures and sticking by

Famous Failures

 

Einstein was 4 years old before he could speak.

 

Iassc Newton did poorly in grade school and was considered "unpromising."

 

When Thomas Edison was a youngster, his teacher told him he was too stupid to learn anything. He was counseled to go into a field

where he might succeed by virtue of his pleasant personality.

 

F.W. Woolworth got a job in a dry goods store when he was 21, but his boss would not permit him to wait on customers because he "didn't have enough sense to close a sale."

 

Michael Jordan was cut from his high school basketball team.

Bob Cousy suffered the same fate, but he too is a Hall of Famer.

 

A newspaper editor fired Walt Disney because he "lacked imagination and had no original ideas."

 

Winston Churchill failed the 6th grade and had to repeat it because he did not complete the tests that were required for promotion.

 

Babe Ruth struck out 1,300 times, a major league record.

 

A person may make mistakes, but is not a failure until he or she starts blaming someone else. We must believe in ourselves, and somewhere along the road of life we will meet someone who sees greatness in us and let us know it.

 

Have a Joyful Weekend…!!!


regards
Raghunandan JAGDISH
+91-9322692934
Nandan GSE Pvt Ltd
CEO and Director
raghu@nandan.co.in
www.Nandan.co.in

forgive brevity..composed on handphone.. better to write fewer words but in time and that which makes sense :)


NANDAN does not accept liability for the integrity of this message or for any changes, which may occur in transmission due to network, machine or software failure or manufacture or operator error. Although this communication and any files transmitted with it are believed to be free of any virus or any other defect which might affect any computer or IT system into which they are received and opened, it is the responsibility of the recipient to ensure that they are virus free and no responsibility will be accepted by NANDAN for any loss or damage arising in any way from receipt or use thereof.

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Saturday, January 30, 2016

Leadership

 

In 1982, Jan Carlson had just been named the CEO of Scandinavian Airlines. His company was in trouble. They had just been ranked by a consumer poll as the worst airline in the world. Last in service, last in dependability, and last in profits as a percentage of sales. Yet one year later, in the same poll, they were ranked number one in all three categories. What happened?

 

Carlson had decided to focus on what he thought was the most critical issue...serving the customer. He wanted to keep it simple:
Identify every contact between the customer and the employee, and treat that contact as..."a moment of truth."

 

He set out to let his people know the importance of that moment...the captain, the ticket agent, the baggage handler, the flight attendant.

 

"Every moment, every contact," he said, "must be as pleasant, and as memorable as possible."

 

He figured that he had approximately ten million customers each year, and on average each customer made contact with five of his people for approximately fifteen seconds apiece. Therefore, in his mind, these fifty million contacts, fifteen seconds at a time, would determine the fate of his company.

 

He set out to share his vision with his twenty thousand employees. He knew the key was to empower the front line. Let them make the decision and take action, because they were Scandinavian Airlines during those fifteen seconds. He now had twenty thousand people who were energized and ready to go because they were focused on one very important thing...making every moment count.

 

"A leader's job is to look into the future and see the organization,not as it is, but as it should be."



NANDAN does not accept liability for the integrity of this message or for any changes, which may occur in transmission due to network, machine or software failure or manufacture or operator error. Although this communication and any files transmitted with it are believed to be free of any virus or any other defect which might affect any computer or IT system into which they are received and opened, it is the responsibility of the recipient to ensure that they are virus free and no responsibility will be accepted by NANDAN for any loss or damage arising in any way from receipt or use thereof.

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Friday, January 29, 2016

London to New York in 11 minutes - The Times of India on Mobile

http://m.timesofindia.com/home/science/London-to-New-York-in-11-minutes/articleshow/50766355.cms

regards
Raghunandan JAGDISH
+91-9322692934
Nandan GSE Pvt Ltd
CEO and Director
raghu@nandan.co.in
www.Nandan.co.in

forgive brevity..composed on handphone.. better to write fewer words but in time and that which makes sense :)


NANDAN does not accept liability for the integrity of this message or for any changes, which may occur in transmission due to network, machine or software failure or manufacture or operator error. Although this communication and any files transmitted with it are believed to be free of any virus or any other defect which might affect any computer or IT system into which they are received and opened, it is the responsibility of the recipient to ensure that they are virus free and no responsibility will be accepted by NANDAN for any loss or damage arising in any way from receipt or use thereof.

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Wednesday, January 20, 2016

How to say sorry at work


how to say sorry

So, you messed up. Maybe you missed a deadline, made an glaring error, or had a tense miscommunication with a coworker. It happens. There are endless ways to mess up at work. But luckily, there are almost just as many ways you can make things right.

We all know that apologizing is a crucial social skill, but what's the best way to say sorry in the workplace?

There's more to it than shrugging and saying, "I'm sorry." An effective apology is one that acknowledges a situation and ultimately makes things better. It's a learned skill, and not one that comes naturally. If you take some time to be thoughtful, you can learn some techniques to make your apologies as smooth as they can be. Once you have that down, you can make all the mistakes you want. (I'm kidding. Don't do that.)

Why apologize?

Saying sorry is something that comes naturally to most people—andsometimes too naturally. But some people don't stop to think about it at all. In general, most apologies serve two major purposes:

  1. It demonstrates remorse for your actions.
  2. It acknowledges the feelings of other people affected by your actions.

At work this is particularly important: apologizing opens up a dialog with your coworkers and can serve to re-establish trust or repair relationships. It's also a way to demonstrate your sense of accountability.

While an apology might seem trivial or unnecessary in some situations, owning your mistake and suggesting a solution can go a long way. Admitting fault might seem like a failure, but it's not. Taking responsibility for a mistake shows integrity, courage, and empathy—valuable traits in the workplace.

And always remember that an apology isn't for your benefit. A true apology is for the person on the other side, so always put them first.

8 steps to apologizing at work

Saying sorry in the workplace is delicate. Depending on the severity of your mistake (especially if there are legal or PR repercussions), finding the courage to apologize can be hard. But not apologizing can make things worse. So let's get into it. Consider these eight steps before attempting to smooth things over.

Start from sincerity

There's no point in apologizing if you don't mean it. This is a basic tenet of apologies, one that we've all learned as children. People can tell when you're not sincere, and an insincere apology is more than worthless: it's disrespectful.

If you don't feel like what you did or said was wrong, than consider the effect it had and the way it affected other people on your team. Can you admit that their their feelings are worth addressing? Or even acknowledge that a mistake simply made other people's lives just a little bit harder. Always start from a sincere place.

Empathize with enthusiasm

Really put yourself in another person's shoes. What would you want to hear if the situation were reversed? Talk yourself through the steps to truly understand where they are coming from and how they are feeling. Do they feel betrayed? Frustrated? Embarrassed? Understanding the emotions involved makes the rest of your apology much easier.

Take true responsibility

Understand how you messed up, and own it. For me, this is usually the hardest part. My instinct is to be defensive. I hate being wrong! But owning a mistake conveys to the other person that you're sincere and empathize with how they feel. It's the part of saying sorry that some people skip, but it demonstrates courage and confidence.

Validate the other person's feelings

We aren't robots. Humans are emotional creatures that need to be acknowledged and to have others know that our feelings are legitimate. Take into account—and communicate that you understand—specifically how your actions affected others. It goes a long way in repairing the damage.

It can help to articulate those feelings out loud:

  • "I can see how this made you feel left out"
  • "I don't want to undermine your authority"
  • "I should be more respectful of your privacy"

You're letting the other person know that you understand how they feels and that you want to make amends.

Don't make excuses, but provide a rationale

This is tricky ground that we've all tried to walk at some point. It's a fine line between an excuse and a reason. Saying "My dog ate my homework is an excuse" (and probably a lie!), but saying "I had trouble understanding the homework," offers a rationale and explanation for why it wasn't handed in.

While not a justification, it can be helpful to explain yourself. But if you can't tell whether you're making an excuse or providing a reason, it's better not to say anything.

Embrace the awkward

Let's face it: apologizing can be super awkward. There's really no way to avoid it. I sometimes want to make a joke to lighten the situation, but it usually doesn't go over well. The time you should wait before making a joke is correlated to how big that mistake is. In other words: patience before punchlines.

Instead, be upfront to address the elephant in the room: "This is awkward, but I need to apologize." Being candid can help deflate some of the tension.

Suggest ways to make up for your mistake

Researchers at the University of Miami found that "the extent to which a transgressor offered conciliatory gestures to their victims was directly proportional to the extent to which those victims forgave over time."

I always offer a solution for a mistake, or suggest ways to prevent it from happening in the future. If you're making promises about the future, be realistic. Messing up once is OK, and people are generally understanding. But if you can't follow through, it's not going to reflect well on you. For me, it's easy to want to over-promise. Resist the urge! It won't help you in the long run.

Learn from it

We all screw up, it's a part of life. All we can do is to extract a lesson and move on. And in this case, you can learn from your mistake and your apology.

I start by thinking how I can avoid this mistake in the future, or maybe navigate that situation better in the future. Was my apology well received? How could it have been better? Depending on what I did, it might take a few tries to actually stop making that mistake, but at the very least I try to take a nugget of wisdom from the situation.

Moving on

Eventually, you'll find yourself having to apologize at work. Nobody's perfect. But by owning your mistake, recognizing how your actions affected other people, and learning how to make things better, your next apology will hopefully be a bit easier.

Apologies are kind of uncomfortable, and that's a good thing. It's a reminder that we should consider other people's feelings before acting, and a powerful disincentive for selfish behavior. In the end, saying sorry can only make you a better person.


NANDAN does not accept liability for the integrity of this message or for any changes, which may occur in transmission due to network, machine or software failure or manufacture or operator error. Although this communication and any files transmitted with it are believed to be free of any virus or any other defect which might affect any computer or IT system into which they are received and opened, it is the responsibility of the recipient to ensure that they are virus free and no responsibility will be accepted by NANDAN for any loss or damage arising in any way from receipt or use thereof.

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Tuesday, January 12, 2016

Why planning, not ambition, is the true driver of success


goals

As industry jargon goes, "eating your own dogfood" does little for the appetite, but it's impossible to deny our devotion to it. Every day we use Asana to track the work that goes into designing our product, keeping our employees happy, and sharing our story with the world. Asana runs on Asana.

For the Workstyle team, all this dogfooding means we're thinking about self-improvement and process all year long. And our continuous research about the culture and future of work makes us introspective about Asana's mission and how we can achieve it.

The mission to the moon

Which brings us to January, when water cooler talk is heavy with intentions for 2016. If you're like us, you're energized by this kind of thinking. But this year, we want to talk about something slightly different. As interested as we are about goals and resolutions, we're just as excited to talk about the work you do along the way.

A favorite metaphor of ours is the mission to the moon: a project that's laudable, challenging, and ambitious. But for us a goal isn't the end, it's the beginning. Working backward from spongy lunar footsteps, one encounters teams of people embroiled in careful planning, strenuous training, meticulous calculations, and continual testing—and that is the true story of the work. The path that connects you from your goals to results, however distant that destination may be.

Why your path matters

It's more than a platitude (or an Aerosmith lyric) that "life's a journey, not a destination." In work planning, there is often so much focus on the finish line, that you may forget about the thousand steps in between. And scientific research suggests that too much farsightedness can have negative consequences.

In a 2009 study, 163 people were asked to write down a personal goal. Half announced their commitment publicly, and the other half did not. They were given 45 minutes of work that would directly help them achieve their goal, but told they could stop at any time. Derek Sivers shares what happened in a TED Talk:

"Those who kept their mouths shut worked the entire 45 minutes on average, and when asked afterward, said that they felt that they had a long way to go still to achieve their goal. But those who had announced it quit after only 33 minutes, on average, and when asked afterward, said that they felt much closer to achieving their goal."

When you articulate your ambitions in public, it can create a social reality where you feel a premature sense of accomplishment. Neurologist Gabriele Oettingen echoes similar findings from her own research, in the New York Times: "Fantasizing about happy outcomes—about smoothly attaining your wishes—didn't help. Indeed, it hindered people from realizing their dreams." Rather than motivate you, thinking about the destination can actually make you work less hard to get there.

The balance between dreams and drudgery

The new year isn't a major milestone at Asana. This one happened halfway through an episode (we don't use quarters), so most of us have already established the objectives we are working toward. That doesn't mean goal-setting is a waste of time. It's useful to make resolutions at work. But it's important give weight to both your vision and the road you'll take to get there. Dr. Oettingen suggests a hybrid approach that combines positive thinking with realism':

"Here's how it works. Think of a wish. For a few minutes, imagine the wish coming true, letting your mind wander and drift where it will. Then shift gears. Spend a few more minutes imagining the obstacles that stand in the way of realizing your wish."

Much of the communication at Asana consists of assigning tasks to one another. Talk is tethered to something actionable, like a task or project. Starting something new is ultimately an exercise in making obstacles explicit and assigning responsibility for work. We don't make resolutions in a vacuum, so goal-setting and plan-making are synonymous. When we create objectives, they're as much map as they are destination: We dive into the details and consider every step along the way.

The road to liftoff

Which brings us back to January. The energy derived from purposeful conversations is valuable, but also take a moment to ask: "How are we going to get there?"

Asana's ongoing mission is to help humanity thrive by enabling all teams to work together effortlessly. It's not conveniently nestled in a single task or project. On the contrary, it represents an ever-increasing number of projects, happening now, in parallel and serial—and we've got a long way to go.

So we must take our mission and divide it into smaller elements that we can take action on. We have to assign these tasks to one (and only one) person, and give each task a deadline. We need to communicate frequently to move work forward, and continually review our progress to ensure we're headed the right way.

This is the process of tracking our work—and we can't imagine achieving our mission without it.

We want to help you discover the most direct path connecting your goals to the results that are important to you. For our metaphorical astronauts destined for the moon, that path is somewhere between a hopeful wish directed at the skies, and a mountain of unordered and unassigned to-dos.

As we set off this year, we know our work will involve as much looking down at schematics as looking up at the big prize. And when we approach our goal, it is hoped that the path we blaze through the sky is the one of least resistance. The one that makes teamwork as effortless as footsteps on the moon.


NANDAN does not accept liability for the integrity of this message or for any changes, which may occur in transmission due to network, machine or software failure or manufacture or operator error. Although this communication and any files transmitted with it are believed to be free of any virus or any other defect which might affect any computer or IT system into which they are received and opened, it is the responsibility of the recipient to ensure that they are virus free and no responsibility will be accepted by NANDAN for any loss or damage arising in any way from receipt or use thereof.

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